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Unity Bank Airtime Giveaway
WIN free airtime using the UniFi app!
 
HOW TO WIN
Just get 3 people to sign up on the app through your referral code and Win instant Airtime

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By brandenvoy
Win Big in the ART X Giveaway in partnership with Access Bank
 Are you an Art Lover to ?
Log on to www.artxlagos.com/prize to submit your entries and stand a chance to win Big.
 
PRIZES
N1,000,000 up for grabs.
  Entries Start From May 21st and End on 15th June, 2018.

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By brandenvoy
22 Winners To Visit Russia in the Glo World Recharge & Win Promo
HOW TO WIN
*Send “GO” to 240 and use a minimum of N3000 on voice or minimum of N5000 on voice + data to qualify for the draws. 
*Additional usage of N500 gives you an extra entry into the draws. 
#GoRussia

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By brandenvoy
BlackBerry set to release BlackBerry KeyTwo, a new phone with a physical keyboard
I never saw the attraction, and went straight from an alphanumeric keypad to a touchscreen without a thought. As we know, after a (very) rough patch, BlackBerry is back with the same strong ideals and a compelling phone package that catapulted its name to fame a decade or more ago. Including the return of what made it famous in the first place: The physical keyboard. It’s about to release a follow-up to that phone, the BlackBerry KeyOne, which last year got BlackBerry fans all sweaty under their collar and ties.
The upcoming KeyTwo will turn more heads. But what if you’re like me and a physical keyboard newbie? Is that physical keyboard the typing nirvana grizzled smartphone owners make it out to be — offering speed, tactility, and precision? Should you and I, touchscreen typists, be tempted to give it a try?
Muscle memory
I purchased my first smartphone, an HTC Touch, in 2007, which means I’ve been typing on a touchscreen for more than a decade. Transferring my mobile activity over to the KeyOne, the phone used in this experiment, was exciting. It just looks so different. The phone is incredibly solid, with real heft and weight, something made more noticeable in your hand because the keyboard is very low-slung. It’s close to the bottom of the KeyOne’s body. Put it next to an iPhone X, and the entire keyboard takes up the same space occupied by only the two lowest rows of the touchscreen keyboard.

I settled into resting the phone on two fingers with my right hand, and gripping it almost like a game controller with the other.

This is obstacle one, the first of several on the journey to typing properly with the KeyOne, and all are related to muscle memory. Just holding the phone in preparation to type feels different, and you must readjust your grip straight away. It’s harder than it sounds too, and even after several weeks typing on the KeyOne, my fingers and hands haven’t naturally adjusted to the way the KeyOne needs to be cradled. Oddly, it’s the pinky finger that’s the problem. It usually acts as a support under a touchscreen phone; but the KeyOne’s low keyboard makes this impossible.
Eventually, I settled into resting the phone on two fingers with my right hand, and gripping it almost like a game controller with the other. It’s not what I’d call comfortable, and I still shift the phone around trying to find a more natural position; but it works. My thumbs were the next problem. They didn’t seem to bend in the right way, and actually pressing down keys obviously took more effort to do than tapping a piece of glass. It’s more the angle of the middle knuckle that’s new, as pressing the keys is performed with the tip of your finger, rather than the pad.
blackberry keyone tips and tricks 4
After a few days adjusting to the shape of the phone, the angle of my thumbs, and settling into holding the phone “properly,” it was time to start typing at the 60-plus words-per-minute I’d seen people averaging out at on BlackBerry forums.
The need for speed
If I was aiming for 60 words-per-minute, I had a lot of work to do. According to the Typing Speed Test app downloaded from Google Play, my average was 25 words per minute. Carrying out the same test on the OnePlus 6, I averaged about 35 words per minute. On the iPhone X, using a different app, I could manage 48 words per minute. I hadn’t set any keyboard on fire with my speed, but I was definitely faster on the touchscreen.

Accuracy was usually 10 percent to 15 percent higher when typing on the BlackBerry.

Is that it, the end? Touchscreens forever? No. What surprised me was the accuracy was usually 10 percent to 15 percent higher when typing on the BlackBerry compared to the touchscreen, showing just how much I usually rely on the autocorrect to make my messages not look like they were typed when I was drunk.
Even after a couple of weeks my speed didn’t improve much. However, I did get used to using the gestures on the KeyOne, which quickens the message-creation process. Swiping up on the touch-sensitive keyboard to select auto-suggested words is very helpful, and the more you use it, the better it gets at understanding what you may say. It’s also handy to swipe to the side to delete words, which I utilized a lot. This was also surprising, having never got used to gesture-based touchscreen keyboards like Swype.
Tactility
Physical keyboards on phones are often trumpeted online as the last word in speed, and this may be the case for those who owned a succession of BlackBerry phones, but its not for anyone used to a touchscreen. This emphasis on speed actually misses the point entirely. Typing on the KeyOne didn’t make me faster — it only made me slightly more accurate; but it did feel different, and in a good way.
What people don’t always mention about physical keyboards on phones is the pleasing feeling of those tiny buttons under your thumb. There’s something wonderfully mechanical about pressing each key in succession. Not in a tedious retro-is-so-cool way, but because it connects you physically to the device more. Not better — it’s just a different degree of tactility.
swapping iphone for blackberry keyboard appreciation keyone
This enjoyment — yes, actual typing enjoyment — was increased by the gestures, whether it was swiping away a misspelt word or sliding up and down to scroll through a webpage, the multifunction keyboard works as a coherent part of the phone, rather than a tacked-on nod to the past, at the risk of romanticizing it too much. Typing on the KeyOne became like pulling down the arm on a slot machine compared to tapping a button to spin. It’s a physicality that simply can’t be replicated.
Satisfaction
Notice I’m not saying better, or improved upon. It’s not that. I type faster on a touchscreen, after all. But I don’t derive any satisfaction from doing so. It’s a process, or a means to an end. The BlackBerry KeyOne isn’t quite so — digital — about it. Has it converted me? Not quite. The lure of a big touchscreen is still too much, and I can bash out messages quicker on it too. However, with BlackBerry telling Digital Trends it has two new phones coming this year that aren’t based on the KeyOne or Motion, we’re excited to see if one is the rumored Uni, which may have a retractable keyboard and the desirable big screen.
Individuality in the smartphone world is in short supply. A phone with a physical keyboard is genuinely unusual, and what we want to do here is encourage you to give the KeyOne or forthcoming KeyTwo a try. Not because of any possible typing speed improvement, but because typing in a BlackBerry keyboard today is so delightfully unique.

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By brandenvoy
Samsung confirms Galaxy Note S9 will have Bixby 2.0
The Galaxy Note 8 has both finger-unlock and face-unlock systems, so how will Samsung improve on this for the Note 9? Well first, it looks like Samsung may be planning to improve its Intelligent Scan technology. A new patent, first reported by Let’s Go Digital, shows Samsung is working on a fish-eye selfie camera for the Note 9. In addition to providing viewing angles of 150 degrees or more, the lens would also improve iris-scanning capabilities for the upcoming flagship.
Reports about an in-display fingerprint sensor have been conflicting thus far. After months of rumors that the Note 9 would not feature such technology, a new report from The Investor reports Samsung is considering the addition of an in-display fingerprint sensor on this year’s Note 9.
Samsung did file a patent for an in-display fingerprint sensor. The patent was first picked up by Dutch site Let’s Go Digital, and was published by the World Intellectual Property Organization. It describes the use of a relatively small sensor — in-display fingerprint sensors typically take up a lot of space — and involves registering part of the fingerprint as soon as the finger touches the display. Then, depending on where the finger is placed, the second part of the finger is registered. In other words, the technology can recognize different parts of the finger, which may lead to a better authentication rate.
Of course, that doesn’t mean Samsung will for sure include the in-display fingerprint sensor in the Galaxy Note 9. It appears that Samsung is still trying to perfect the technology, and that may be the reason KGI Securities reported the company would likely forgo the addition of an in-display fingerprint sensor in 2018. In May, Ice Universe posted a tweet stating that we will not see such technology on the upcoming flagship.
Samsung has apparently been trying to implement the under-display sensor with its large Infinity Display for two years but hasn’t successfully completed the task to the satisfaction of the engineers, due to problems related to manufacturing, quantity, and accuracy. Another anonymous source in the industry said under-display sensors are difficult to commercialize at this stage, but thinks Samsung will solve the problem in 2019.
Name and release date
As sure as the Galaxy Note 8 followed the Galaxy Note 7, the Galaxy Note 9 will follow 2017’s flagship big-screen phone. But when will it arrive, and will the naming convention continue? Samsung said it began work on the Galaxy Note 9 immediately after completing the Galaxy Note 8, and was “considering how to approach the development of the next Note by evaluating the latest model and looking for ways to improve upon signature features like the S Pen.” This suggests the Note 9 will be an evolution of the Note 8, rather than a reinvention.
If a name change is coming, it has not been rumored, but a leak did hint at the code name: Crown. Rumors from the end of 2017 suggest Samsung may launch the Galaxy Note 9 in August, around the same time of year as the Galaxy Note 8, with production set to begin during the first three months of 2018.
A leak related to the Snapdragon 845 processor put the Galaxy Note 9’s release down as September 2018, which may refer to when sales start, which would fit in with an August announcement. But according to the latest report by Korean news outlet The Investor, the device may be released as early as July or August. This seems to line up with news from Let’s Go Digital stating that Samsung certified two devices believed to be the upcoming Note 9 through the Chinese Ministry of Industry and Information Technology (CMIIT) in April; the certification lists the model numbers for the two devices as SM-N9600 and SM-N9608, which appear to be variants of the U.S. model number, SM-N960U.
The prediction of an earlier release stems from reports that Samsung Display will start producing an OLED panel for the Note 9 in April — which is two months earlier than its usual start date in June. It could also be Samsung’s attempt to release the device prior to Apple’s new iPhones, which normally launch in September.
Specifications
The Galaxy Note is Samsung’s productivity powerhouse phone, and we’d expect the Note 9 to have specs to match. What will make the Note 9 special? Samsung said it’s investigating “signature Note features” to upgrade on the Note 9, including the S Pen stylus. However, that statement was made early in the phone’s development, so plans may change by the time the phone reaches store shelves.
In March, information about the upcoming Galaxy S9 appeared courtesy of Geekbench.  Benchmarks on the site claim the phone will feature the expected Qualcomm 845 chipset as well as 6GB of RAM.
Qualcomm is likely to supply the processor for the Note 9 in some regions. The phone was listed in a leak of the devices using the Snapdragon 845 in 2018. While this will probably apply to phones released in the United States, other regions may have a Note 9 powered by a Samsung-designed Exynos chip.
According to a tweet from well-known anonymous leaker @Universelce, the Galaxy Note 9 could include either a 3,850mAH or 4,000mAh battery. This means the new device could include a larger battery than the 3,300mAh battery on the Galaxy Note 8.
That’s all we know about the Samsung Galaxy Note 9 for now. We’ll continue to update as we learn more.

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By brandenvoy
Win Big in the Delta Soap Scratch and Win Promo
Buy a Bar of Delta Medicated soap Scratch & Win Recharge Card From N50 – N500 Free in Every Bar.

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By brandenvoy
Your next transaction could make your dreams come true.
Make transactions with #KeystoneBank and stand a chance to win up to N100,000,000.00 weekly with the #CashToken rewards.
More Details HERE

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By brandenvoy
Nike’s latest patent turns your workout clothes into towels
In a patent issued to the shoe and athletic wear giant last week, the company outlines plans to add what it calls “wipe zones” to traditional athletic garments. Made from a different type of material than typically found in exercise apparel, these zones would allow the wearer to quickly and efficiently wipe away perspiration, keeping their hands and brow drier in the process, without interfering with the performance of the workout clothes in any way.
According to the patent filing, these wipe zones would be created from yarn that has “a very small denier-per-filament” ratio. What that means is that the material would be made up of very fine fibers that create a larger surface area thanks to a larger number of filaments contained in a smaller space. This has the benefit of allowing the fabric to remove an increased amount of moisture from a person’s skin when it is wiped across the garment. The yarn used to create these wipe zones would also be made of hydrophobic materials, which means the moisture wouldn’t be absorbed, but would evaporate quickly instead.
Nike Patent: Wipe Zones
The wipe zones would also be strategically placed on workout apparel in places where people naturally tend to wipe away perspiration. For instance, the neck line of a shirt is often used to wipe sweat from the eyes, while the hem around the bottom of the shirt is used to wipe the face. Similarly, the front of a pair of shorts is used by athletes to dry their hands too. Nike’s patent looks to incorporate its low denier per filament fabrics into those places, without interfering with the garment’s ability to vent heat and wick moisture.
As with all patents, it is unclear when we would potentially see actual products that use this technology, if ever. Still, it is nice to know that Nike is looking for ways to make us more comfortable during our workouts.

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By brandenvoy
The Jumia juggling Challenge
HOW TO WIN
1. Make a short video of yourself juggling a ball⚽
2. Upload it with the hashtag #CelebrateDGame
3. Comment HERE with the link to your video to qualify

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By brandenvoy
Heritage Bank Children’s Day Poetry Competition
Have you sent in your poem for the Children’s Day Poetry Competition?
HERE IS HOW TO WIN
Children (7-15 years old) will write a 200 words poem on  “Light Tomorrow With Today” and upload on Facebook to generate likes from friends and family. 
Make sure you tag @HeritageBank Ng when posting and use the hashtag #LightTomorrowWithToday.
#heritagebank 
#poetrycompetition 
#ChildrenBanking

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By brandenvoy